U.S. warns U.N. members against backing next vote on Jerusalem

U.S. ambassador Nikki Haley has warned members of the United Nations against supporting another resolution condemning President Donald Trump’s policy shift that names Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

Ambassador Nikki Haley raises her hand to veto a Security Council resolution that condemns the United States' policy shift on Jerusalem. The resolution failed by a vote of 14-1. Photo by Justin Lane/EPA
Ambassador Nikki Haley raises her hand to veto a Security Council resolution that condemns the United States’ policy shift on Jerusalem. The resolution failed by a vote of 14-1. Photo by Justin Lane/EPA

The United States this week vetoed a Security Council resolution renouncing the move — prompting a number of Middle Eastern leaders to call for another vote in the General Assembly. Haley said Tuesday the Trump administration will pay attention, and “take names” of those who vote for the resolution.

“At the U.N. we’re always asked to do more & give more,” Haley tweeted. “So, when we make a decision, at the will of the American people, about where to locate OUR embassy, we don’t expect those we’ve helped to target us.”

Haley also sent a letter Tuesday to foreign leaders, saying Trump will watch the next resolution vote “very carefully” — and that he asked her to “report back on those countries who voted against us.”

“As you know, the General Assembly is considering a resolution about President Trump’s recent decision on Jerusalem,” Haley wrote in the letter. “As you consider your vote, I want you to know that the President and U.S. take this vote personally.”

“The U.S. Congress declared [in 1995] that Jerusalem should be recognized as the capital of Israel and that the U.S. Embassy should be located in Jerusalem. President Trump affirmed that declaration by officially recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel,” her letter said.

Haley is pushing for U.N. members to stand by Trump’s effort to move the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem — signifying the city as the country’s capital.

The U.S. veto last week has drawn backlash among Muslim and Middle Eastern leaders. Over the last decade, the United States has used veto power only twice.

“[The United States] lost by 14-1 on issue of Jerusalem,” Carl Blidt, Sweden’s former prime minister and Co-Chair of the European Council on Foreign Relations, tweeted. “Now it’s getting nervous and threatening prior to a vote in the U.N. General Assembly.”

The Jerusalem resolution will be presented to the General Assembly on Thursday and is expected to pass — although it would largely be only a symbolic act.

By Sara Shayanian