U.N. Security Council approves resolution for North Korean fuel cuts

The United Nations Security Council on Friday unanimously passed a new North Korea sanctions resolution that adds more fuel cuts.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley's call for fuel cuts to North Korea was followed with a new U.N. Security Council sanctions resolution on Friday. Photo by Manuel Elias/United Nations | License Photo
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley’s call for fuel cuts to North Korea was followed with a new U.N. Security Council sanctions resolution on Friday. Photo by Manuel Elias/United Nations | License Photo

The resolution, created by the United States, marks the fourth North Korea proposal to be adopted in 2017, and the 10th to pass since 2006, when the Security Council adopted Resolution 1718 following North Korea’s first nuclear test.

The sanctions hit North Korea with a cut in delivery of petroleum products, which includes an 89 percent reduction in diesel and kerosene, limiting delivery to 500,000 barrels per year.

September’s Resolution 2375 had reduced petroleum product delivery to North Korea to 2 million barrels from 4.5 million barrels, an ordinance that went into effect Oct. 1.

The latest resolution also limits North Korea crude imports to 4 million barrels annually, according to a fact sheet from the U.S. Mission to the United Nations.

U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley has said the goal of sanctions, following North Korea’s test of the Hwasong-15, a long-range missile, is to completely shut off oil supply to Pyongyang, with or without China’s help.

“We now turn to President Xi [Jinping] to also take that stand. We believe he has an opportunity to do the right thing for the benefit of all countries. China must show leadership and follow through. China can do this on its own, or we can take the oil situation into our own hands,” Haley said in November.

The resolution also orders the expulsion of North Korean state laborers working outside the country within 24 months, according to the U.S. fact sheet.

By Elizabeth Shim and Sam Howard