U.N. facilitates cease-fire for Libya violence

Warring groups in Libya reached a cease-fire in a conflict that has killed nearly 50 people, the United Nations Support Mission in Libya said Tuesday.

The United Nations Support Mission in Libya said groups in Libya agreed to a ceasefire to halt violence in the capital of Tripoli and reopen the city's Mitiga Airport. Photo courtesy United Nations Support Mission in Libya
The United Nations Support Mission in Libya said groups in Libya agreed to a ceasefire to halt violence in the capital of Tripoli and reopen the city’s Mitiga Airport. Photo courtesy United Nations Support Mission in Libya

The agreement called for an end to fighting in the capital city of Tripoli, and to protect civilians, safeguard public and private property, and reopen Meitiga Airport, the UNSMIL announced.

“The agreement — signed by representatives of the Government of National Accord, military commanders security apparatuses and armed groups present in and around the Capital — comprises an immediate cessation of hostilities and a mechanism to monitor infractions,” the U.N. group said.

Fighting among the groups began Aug. 26 and officials said at least 47 people have been killed and 1,800 families have been displaced, the BBC reported.

RELATED Migrant ship Aquarius docks in Malta after EU dispute
The latest deal follows a cease-fire announced by officials from western cities last week, which only stood for a few hours.

The UNSMIL added U.N. envoy Ghassan Salame will continue to facilitate deals among all parties and the mission will look to expand the deal.

“The mission will reach out to other parties who expressed interest in joining the cease-fire but were unable to attend, and commits to continue facilitations to strengthen the cease-fire and discuss the appropriate security arrangements in the capital,” the UNSMIL said.

RELATED U.N.: Up to 30,000 Islamic State members remain in Iraq, Syria
The governments of France, Italy, Britain and the United States issued a joint statement welcoming the deal.

“We reiterate our strong support for Special Representative of the Secretary-General Ghassan Salame as he works to realize an immediate and durable cessation of hostilities in the Libyan capital, which is a critical step to advancing the political process in accordance with the United Nations Action Plan,” they said.

ByDaniel Uria