Syria, France most dangerous countries for journalists in 2015

WASHINGTON,  Syria and France are the most dangerous countries for journalists as covering politics is the most hazardous assignment worldwide, a report released Tuesday by the Committee to Protect Journalists indicates.

Syria and France are the most dangerous countries for journalists as covering politics is the most dangerous assignment worldwide, according to a report released Tuesday by the Committee to Protect Journalists. In France, nine journalists were killed -- including eight in the Charlie Hedbo massacre in January. File photo by Eco Clement/UPI | License Photo
Syria and France are the most dangerous countries for journalists as covering politics is the most dangerous assignment worldwide, according to a report released Tuesday by the Committee to Protect Journalists. In France, nine journalists were killed — including eight in the Charlie Hedbo massacre in January. File photo by Eco Clement/UPI | License Photo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Isis and al-Qaida were responsible for the deaths of 28 journalists, CPJ said in its annual report. Worldwide, 69 journalists were killed between Jan. 1 and Dec. 23.

“The most common beat covered by victims was politics, followed by war and human rights,” CPJ writes in the report. “At least 28 of the 47 murder victims received threats before they were killed.”

In Syria, 13 journalists were killed — less than in recent years due to journalists fleeing the country and news organizations choosing not to send staff to the war-stricken nation. In France, nine journalists were killed — including eight in the Charlie Hedbo massacre in January.

More than two-thirds of journalists killed worldwide in 2015 were singled out in reprisal for their work, the highest CPJ has recorded since 2010 but in line with the historical average.

The total deaths also include the killings of a publisher and four bloggers in Bangladesh — all who were stabbed or hacked to death in public.

Combat or crossfire killed 17 journalists worldwide while five were killed during a dangerous assignment, CPJ reports. The most dangerous job for journalist is broadcast reporting, as 25 in that occupation were killed.

“For the first time since 2007, CPJ did not document a single journalist killed in direct relation to work in the Philippines,” CPJ reported. “However, at least seven journalists were killed in unclear circumstances, and CPJ continues to investigate these cases for a work-related motive.”

By Andrew V. Pestano

UPI NEWS