Israelis build world’s largest Lego tower to honor 8-year-old cancer victim

A group of Israelis constructed the world’s largest Lego tower to honor a young cancer patient who died two years ago.

Thousands of Israelis came together to construct the world's largest Lego tower in Tel Aviv to honor 8-year-old cancer patient Omer Sayag, who died in 2014. Photo by Abir Sultan/EPA
Thousands of Israelis came together to construct the world’s largest Lego tower in Tel Aviv to honor 8-year-old cancer patient Omer Sayag, who died in 2014. Photo by Abir Sultan/EPA

The 117-foot, 11-inch tall tower unveiled Wednesday in Tel Aviv using half a million colorful toy bricks was named “Omer Tower” in honor of 8-year-old Lego enthusiast Omer Sayag, who died in 2014.
Omer Tower was built as a joint effort between Tel Aviv City Hall and Young Engineers, an organization that promotes learning with toy bricks. It measures 35 inches taller than the next tallest structure in Milan.

Guinness World Records officials weren’t on hand to measure the tower on Wednesday, but Tel Aviv city officials said they would submit their measurements to confirm the record.

Omer’s kindergarten teachers, Ben Klinger and Shirley Bardugo contacted Young Engineers after his death to come up with a way to commemorate their late student.

“The models that our students usually build are small, but in this case — together with the Tel Aviv Municipality — we are building a huge tower, made up of sections built by thousands of children and adults in dozens of centers in Tel Aviv, mentored by our instructors, over the past two years,” the group said.

Thousands of people and more than two dozen community organizations in Tel Aviv worked from Dec. 12 to Dec. 24 to complete the massive Lego tower.

Young Engineers said there were “many technical challenges” involved with constructing the tower, including providing hundreds of thousands of bricks and transporting constructed sections to the build site, but the organization was proud to honor Omer’s memory.

“Despite the challenges, we are pleased and proud to take part in this important project that found its way into our heart from day one,” Young Engineers said. “It reflects a great deal of love and positive memories that everyone can relate with.”

By Daniel Uria