Conspiracy theorists think a ‘death planet’ will kill us all on 23 April

If you’re not keen on seeing how Brexit turns out, then you could be in luck, because the world is ending on 23 April.

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It’s a real shame, but all good things, including life on this planet, must come to an end.

But how do we know that you definitely won’t live to see the end of Game of Thrones or witness Trump’s inevitable impeachment?

According to a completely rational and legitimate theory, the Rapture – which basically means the end of the world – will begin couple of weeks when the sun and moon and Jupiter will all be in Virgo.
Astrological constellations are said to match up with passage 12:1-2 of the Book of Revelations, which reads:

And a great sign appeared in heaven: a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of 12 stars. She was pregnant and was crying out in birth pains and the agony of giving birth.

Despite the fact that this particular astrological alignment happens every 12 years, conspiracy theorist David Meade is convinced that, this time, it’s the real deal.

He said:

By early April of 2018, the disappearance of the Church (all true Christians worldwide also known as the Rapture) will occur.

This will be followed quickly by the rise of the Antichrist, the appearance of Planet X and World War III.

Seven years of Tribulation will ensure. This is beyond any shadow of doubt.

NASA has always denied its existence of Mysterious Planet X, or Nibiru. Its spokesperson said:

Nibiru and other stories about wayward planets are an internet hoax. There is no factual basis for these claims.

If Nibiru or Planet X were real and headed for an encounter with the Earth, astronomers would have been tracking it for at least the past decade, and it would be visible by now to the naked eye.

But why let facts or science get in the way of a good story?

By Louis Staples