British PM Cameron urges airstrikes against Islamic State

LONDON,  Prime Minister David Cameron urged Parliament on Thursday to join the United States-led coalition airstrikes against the Islamic State in Syria, saying the militant group “poses a very direct threat.”

British Prime Minister David Cameron, seen here with French President Francois Hollande on Nov. 23, urged British parliament to extend airstrikes agains the Islamic State in Syria. Photo by David Silpa/UPI | License Photo
British Prime Minister David Cameron, seen here with French President Francois Hollande on Nov. 23, urged British parliament to extend airstrikes agains the Islamic State in Syria. Photo by David Silpa/UPI | License Photo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The prime minister, in his appeal to lawmakers, said joining the coalition would mean a stronger military force against the extremists. The Paris attacks have renewed the urgency to dismantle the group, he said, outlining a 36-page plan for Syrian airstrikes. Parliament is expected to vote on the proposal before its recess on Dec. 17.

“We have to ask ourselves if the risks of inaction are greater than those of taking action. All the advice I’ve received says yes,” he said, adding Britain in the the “top tier” of countries to be targeted by the extremist group that goes by the names ISIL, ISIS and Daesh. He added Britian’s involvement will not include ground troops.

Cameron said the seven terror plots agains the country this year have been directed or inspired by the IS. The strikes on the IS will be part of an overall political and diplomatic plan to squeeze the group out of Syria and end the country’s civil war.

He said UN Security Council calls on member states to take “all necessary measures” to “eradicate the safe haven” the group has established in Syria.

“The longer ISIL is allowed to grow in Syria, the greater the threat it will pose. It is wrong for the United Kingdom to subcontract its security to other countries, and to expect the aircrews of other nations to carry the burdens and the risks of striking ISIL in Syria to stop terrorism here in Britain,” he said.

By Amy R. Connolly

UPI