Argentina’s former VP sentenced to nearly 6 years for corruption

Former Argentinian Vice President Amado Boudou was found guilty on corruption charges Tuesday and sentenced to five years and 10 months in prison.

Former Argentinian Vice President Amado Boudou attends his trial at the tribunals of Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Tuesday before he was found guilty and sentenced to nearly 6 years in prison. Photo by David Fernandez/EPA-EFE
Former Argentinian Vice President Amado Boudou attends his trial at the tribunals of Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Tuesday before he was found guilty and sentenced to nearly 6 years in prison. Photo by David Fernandez/EPA-EFE

Boudou’s arrest was ordered immediately and he also was fined 90,000 Argentinian pesos — about $3,300.

The former vice president, who served during the administration of former President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner between 2011 and 2015, maintained his innocence and said he was a victim of political persecution by current President Mauricio Macri.

“This trial has been strange from the beginning, in that the responsibility of proof was inverted. I have had to prove I didn’t know someone, prove I didn’t attend a meeting,” Boudou said, according to the Buenos Aires Times.

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Prosecutors said Boudou lifted a bankruptcy declaration against Ciccone Calcografica, a money-printing company, in 2010, when he was Argentina’s economic minister. In exchange for lifting that declaration, Boudou received a piece of the company, prosecutors said.

The trial ends a four-year saga for Boudou, who was charged in June 2014, becoming the country’s first sitting vice president to face criminal charges.

But more convictions could be coming for former officials in the Fernandez administration in another corruption case. Last week, Argentinian newspaper La Nacion published a series of documents that allegedly detail bribes and payoffs to various officials, including Fernandez, who prosecutors plan to speak with this week.

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TopicsCristina Fernandez de Kirchner
WORLD NEWS AUG. 7, 2018 / 5:22 PM
Japanese medical school changed scores to limit admittance of women
ByDanielle Haynes
Aug. 7 (UPI) — A medical school in Japan admitted Tuesday it altered the results of entrance exams to limit the number of women admitted to the university.

Officials at the Tokyo Medical University offered an apology after an internal investigation revealed the manipulated results starting in 2006.

The probe found that the school subtracted points for female applicants while padding the scores for men. School officials did so out of the belief that women would discontinue their medical careers or take long periods of absence if they got married or had children, Kyodo News reported.

The practice was “nothing but discrimination against women,” one of the lawyers involved in the investigation said.

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The probe found that former Chairman Masahiko Usui and former President Mamoru Suzuki each accepted bribes from the parents of students whose scores had been increased.

University officials said the school would no longer manipulate entrance exam scores and offered to accept potential students whose original scores would have earned them a spot.

“We sincerely apologize for the serious wrongdoing involving entrance exams that has caused concern and trouble for many people and betrayed the public’s trust,” said Tetsuo Yukioka, the school’s managing director, who said he was not involved in the altering of scores.

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ByRay Downs